Majestic Travel Ltd.

Important!

Online Booking Information regarding Pick-up Times:

Customers will be contacted to confirm their online booking by a member of our team via email.
You will then be issued with a Boarding Ticket by post or email containing the confirmed information for your chosen excursion.
The pick-up time will be confirmed for your desired pick-up location 48 hours prior to the date of travel.

Saturday 2nd July Blackpool Carnival

Join us in Blackpool for their annual carnival.

See the usual delights a carnival has to offer, all the fun of the fair. Decorated floats will flow along with the locals in fancy dress, dancers and performers, music, etc.

After the carnival why not hit the beach, ride the attractions on the pier, there are three to choose from, South, North & Central, horse & carriage rides, amusement arcades & more.

Buckets n spades, candy floss, sugar dummies, and sticks of rock, don’t forget to purchase an all-time favourite souvenir tea towel.

Lots of places to visit including Blackpool Tower, Blackpool Zoo, Blackpool Model Village & Gardens, Sealife Centre, Pleasure Beach, Water Park, Madame Tussauds, Clip & Climb, Tower Dungeon, Heritage Tram Tours, and not forgetting the new Peter Rabbit, all require pre-booked entry and are not included in this price.

Saturday 2nd July Blackpool Carnival
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Saturday 9th Liverpool Carnival

Join us in Liverpool for their annual carnival. During the main carnival day, which falls on this day, the streets of the city are filled with lively festivities, featuring superb live performances, kaleidoscopic costumes, traditional Brazilian cuisine, the carnival queen and king competitions, and themed exhibitions. Liverpool carnival dates back to July of 2008. Then, the city was named the European Capital of Culture and held a Rio-style carnival parade to honour the title. The street bash became a great success and turned into one of Liverpool’s favourite annual celebrations.

Discover a variety of things to do in Liverpool, including a lively waterfront, grand architecture, and a buzzing arts and culture scene. Home to the Beatles and two hugely successful football clubs, Liverpool is one of England’s most legendary cities.

This is the place for all things Fab Four. You can spend an afternoon at The Beatles Story museum, see the houses where John Lennon and Paul McCartney grew up, and enjoy a night out at the Cavern Club, where the band famously performed.

Or explore some of Liverpool’s 7 free museums. You can ponder modern art at the Tate Liverpool or entertain the kids at the excellent World Museum Liverpool.

Did you know? Many of the main attractions are concentrated around the historic Albert Dock.

Saturday 9th July Liverpool Carnival
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Saturday 9th Tewkesbury Medieval Festival

Tewkesbury Medieval Festival

Join us in Tewkesbury for this year’s Medieval Festival. It’s widely regarded as the biggest free Medieval gathering in Europe with over 2000 re-enactors and traders travelling from as far afield as France, Poland, Belgium, Spain, Italy, and Germany.

Many live in full Medieval style for the weekend and welcome visitors to the living history camps around the battlefield, King Edward’s camp on Windmill Hill, and Queen Margaret’s camp in Bloody Meadow. The re-enactors cook over open fires, fettle their armour ready for battle, weave, sew, play Medieval board games, whittle spoons, and a myriad of other things.

In the large Medieval market, you can buy anything from a full harness of armour or cooking range to a bottle of mead or a leather belt. There will also be a large exhibition tent where you will find displays from historical societies and an exhibition of Graham Turner’s wonderful paintings which have featured on Tewkesbury posters for over 20 years.

In the Bright Knight tent, you will find Medieval-inspired crafts and shows for younger visitors. Medieval minstrels, jugglers, stilt walkers, friendly dragons, and bears wander around the festival site and there is a varied programme of events in the beer tent.

The Battle of Tewkesbury, which took place on 4 May 1471, was one of the decisive battles of the Wars of the Roses in England.

Prince Edward was killed either during or just after the battle and is now buried in Tewkesbury Abbey.

The Battle is now fought every year with cannons firing, swords clashing and soldiers marching. Thousands of re-enactors and medieval enthusiasts from all around the world visit Tewkesbury as part of the Tewkesbury Medieval Festival. The battleground is filled with knights in armour, warriors, and townsfolk in medieval dress. Many sleep in traditional tents and cook over open fires eating typical medieval food.

There’s so much to discover in Tewkesbury. With a rich, vibrant history and a beautiful waterside setting, there is plenty for everyone to discover. Head to Tewkesbury Abbey; an imposing feature of the town’s landscape for nearly 900 years. Renowned the world over for its fine Norman tower, ornate 12th Century ceiling, and stunning stained-glass windows, the Abbey is one of Gloucestershire’s most popular tourist attractions, second only to Gloucester Cathedral.

The Abbey is just the start of your insight into Tewkesbury’s history which you can explore further through the town’s museums, Heritage Centre, walking trails, and other attractions.

Saturday 9th July Tewkesbury Medieval Festival
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Saturday 16th Bristol Harbour Festival

Join us in Bristol for their annual Harbour Festival. For many people, the Bristol Harbour Festival is an opportunity to celebrate the heart of the beautiful city, and the harbour itself.

In 1802, famous architect William Jessop proposed installing a dam and lock at Hotwells to create the floating harbour and a £530,000 scheme was approved by Parliament. Construction began in May 1804 and today the Harbour still provides the city with a bustling centre filled with activity.

The docks used to be a vital part of Bristol’s economy but in the second half of the 20th Century its prominence began to fade, its economic power waned and questions were asked about what to do with the waterway and the land alongside it. Sadly, the Port of Bristol Authority decided to close the city centre docks in the 1960s.

Local groups took up the fight to save the docks, and an early weapon in their armoury was the first Harbour Festival in 1971. The event grew in size and importance as the years passed, and even when plans to tamper with the docks were shelved, the festival carried on.

In 1996 the festival hosted the first International Festival of the Sea, bringing in tall ships from international waters. That tradition continues to this day, with two of our visiting vessels in 2018 being from the Netherlands and France.

 

This lively university city is full of exciting attractions. There’s fantastic shopping on independent-minded Gloucester Road, great global cuisine from Georgian market hall St Nick’s, and buzzing bars and cafes along the Harbourside.

The most iconic attraction is Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s Clifton Suspension Bridge – a treat to walk or cycle across. Then marvel at another of the engineer’s feats at Brunel’s SS Great Britain Museum. The ship was the largest afloat when it was launched in 1843.

Saturday 16th July Bristol Harbour Festival
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Saturday 23rd Skegness

Join us in Skegness, “Skeggy”, as it’s affectionately known. Get your sunscreen and sun hat, pack your bucket, and spade or buy one when you get there.

Looking for things to do in Skegness? This seaside resort comes with the classic English seaside holiday activities; the donkey rides on the beach, the pier, the crazy golf, but there’s more to come from this Lincolnshire town.

With rollercoaster rides and a seal sanctuary, there’s also plenty for kids to enjoy, whether it’s the thrills of a ride or the joy of seeing seal pups on their way back to being reintroduced to the wild, and with a Blue Flag beach, Skegness has something for everyone.

There are lots of things to see and do, here’s just a few:

Skegness Pier, Nature land, Seafront & Promenade, Skegness Aquarium.

Saturday 23rd July Skegness
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Saturday 23rd Barry Island

Join us in Barry Island, Barry Island has attracted visitors since the 1870s and the appeal of its golden beaches, cafes, and family amusements is stronger than ever.

The recently refurbished seafront now offers a sweeping promenade along the entire length of Whitmore Bay beach, against a backdrop of enticing cafés and restaurants, beach wheelchairs available to loan, vibrant beach huts and lots to amuse the kids with a climbing wall, mist feature, adventure golf, and beautifully landscaped gardens. Or for the more adventurous, Barry Island Pleasure Park offers thrilling rides. And not forgetting the Gavin and Stacey connection.

The Barry Island pleasure park has over 50 rides and attractions for all ages including the Log Flume, Viper Ride, Pirate Ship, Galloping Horses, and the Quasar Centre offers a high-tech paintball style experience. Entry to the park is free. Tokens can be purchased for the rides.

The nearby Barry Island Railway Heritage Centre offers visitors to Barry Island the chance to return to the “Age of Steam”; visit the historic station buildings and view the exhibits. On “Steam Days” travel behind a full-sized locomotive and view carriages and wagons being restored in the purpose-built workshop. The Railway also runs special ‘Footplate Experiences’ offering a day to remember with the thrill of learning to drive a steam or diesel locomotive.

Saturday 23rd July Barry Island
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Sunday 24th Stratford Upon Avon

Join us in Stratford Upon Avon, every visit to Stratford would not be complete without finding out more about the English poet and playwright that makes it famous. Shakespeare’s Birthplace allows you to visit the house where the world’s most famous playwright was born and grew up to discover more about his early years.

Other must-see Shakespeare locations include Hall’s Croft (home to William’s daughter), Shakespeare’s New Place (the last chapter in his life), Anne Hathaway’s cottage (a romantic setting), and Mary Arden’s Farm (the childhood home of Shakespeare’s mother). Entry cost not included.

Stratford Town Centre hosts a diverse range of shops, restaurants, and tea rooms, it’s the perfect place for the whole day.

Other places to visit include the Butterfly Museum, Magic Alley, and the MAD Museum. (Entry not included).

Stratford-upon-Avon’s premier Sunday market, known as the Upmarket.  Open every Sunday from 31 January 2021.   Also, open Bank Holiday Mondays. The Upmarket offers top-quality products, gift ideas, treats & sweets, handcrafted items, designer jewellery, all types of artworks, wooden toys, clothing, delicious street food, and occasional street entertainers and characters to delight the children.   Stroll & browse along a backdrop of elegance, enjoy a treasure trove of expert vendors, local makers, crafters & artists, the loaded stalls make up this charming and splendid market with something for everyone.

Stratford Upon Avon
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Sunday 24th Shrewsbury & Market Drayton

Join us in Shrewsbury, a medieval town with its red-brick castle which houses the Shropshire Regimental Museum. Explore over 1,000 years of history, and its special links with Charles Darwin. Pop into the Visitor Information Centre, the town has over 600 listed buildings including the Castle and the Abbey. Relax in beautiful Quarry Park or take a boat trip on the River Severn.

The historic centre is a shopper’s heaven packed with designer shops, smart new malls, and an amazing range of independent retailers. And of course, all the bars, cafes, restaurants, you could ever wish for.

Then we’re off to Market Drayton, Canal, beer, gingerbread produced in the town for over 200 years, and a jolly good market, with origins dating back to before the Domesday Book.

Market Drayton is a historic and friendly place, a true market town in the middle of Shropshire’s dairy country. The streets of Market Drayton have a much historic character with a mix of half-timbered, Georgian, and Victorian buildings. The streets converge on The Buttercross market shelter.

The spring water is excellent for beer and a fine tradition of brewing is continued today by Joules. Their purpose-built brewery in the town centre supplies great ales to pubs around northern Shropshire and borders. Market Drayton is also known as the home of Gingerbread which has been baked in the town for over 200 years.

The town sits by the Shropshire Union canal about a mile from Tyrley Locks where a flight of five locks makes this one of the most interesting sections of the canal.

Market Drayton is on the John O’Groats to Land’s End cycle route. The canal towpaths, with the added interest of the boats, and the quiet roads in this gentle scenic part of Shropshire are ideal for leisure cycling and easy walks. The town makes a great base for exploring Shropshire, Staffordshire, and South Cheshire, an area strong in fabulous gardens (Wollerton Old Hall, Trentham, Dorothy Clive), heritage sites (Hawkstone Park, Moreton Corbett, Ironbridge Gorge), historic towns & villages and canals.

Sunday 24th July Shrewsbury & Market Drayton
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Monday 25th Tewkesbury

Join us in Tewkesbury, visit the Heritage Centre and use the art portable guides and interactive games to take you from the earliest settlers, through the Wars of the Roses, the Civil War, the industrial revolution, and into the present day.

Tewkesbury Abbey is renowned the world over for its fine Norman tower, ornate12th Century ceiling, and stunning stained-glass windows.

Visit the John Moore Museum (entry costs may be extra), follow the Vintage & Antiques Trail you can explore Tewkesbury’s famous network of alleyways and the medieval old town.

There are plenty of shops and tea rooms so don’t forget to refuel.

 

Monday 25th July Tewkesbury
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Tuesday 26th Matlock Bath & Chesterfield

Join us in Matlock Bath, Matlock Bath was developed as one of England’s first true tourist destinations. Why not follow the Heritage Trail through the village, visit the Mining Museum (entry costs not included). Matlock Bath Aquarium and Exhibitions (entry costs not included). Take a stroll around Derwent Gardens, Cross the bridge to the Lovers’ Walks, Heights of Abraham.

The town is a wonderful place to visit, with a long street of shops, cafes, amusement arcades, and places of interest, including a photographic museum. Riverside walks are great for peaceful, shady strolls, and there is a good children’s playground area.

Visit Masson Mills Shopping Village, independent shops along with your high street favourites, there’s also some lovely places for lunch or just a cuppa and cake.

Then we’re off to Chesterfield, the Heart of Industrial England, and the Gateway to the Peak. Visit the Tourist Information Centre, the peaceful Queen’s Park, the crooked spire on top of the church of Our Lady and All Saints. The Victorian market hall, shops, tea rooms, and an interesting timber-framed pub called the Royal Oak.

 

Explore the historic town centre and you will find the famous Chesterfield Market and the newly refurbished Chesterfield Market Hall and a unique selection of independent traders in The Shambles and The Yards, alongside many high street names on Vicar Lane and in The Pavements Shopping Centre.

TUESDAY 26th July 2022 Matlock Bath & Chesterfield
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Wednesday 27th Bridgnorth & Shrewsbury

Join us in Bridgnorth, winners of the Great British High Street 2016, & the famous River Severn. Bridgnorth was once one of the busiest river ports in Europe, the river divides the town into High Town and Low Town, the two being linked by seven sets of ancient donkey steps one of Shropshire’s most interesting streets, and a Victorian funicular, the Bridgnorth Cliff Railway, the oldest and steepest inland funicular railway.

You can also visit the Northgate Museum, take a wander along the branching streets to find many other historic buildings such as Bishop Percy’s House. Bridgnorth Castle remains now stands in the beautiful Castle Gardens, Daniels Mill, and its impressive waterwheel.

Browse the many independent shops for unique gifts, including antiques. Take five and refresh your energy in one of the cafes, restaurants, and tea rooms.

Then we’re off to Shrewsbury, a medieval town with its red-brick castle which houses the Shropshire Regimental Museum. Explore over 1,000 years of history, and its special links with Charles Darwin. Pop into the Visitor Information Centre, the town has over 600 listed buildings including the Castle and the Abbey. Relax in beautiful Quarry Park or take a boat trip on the River Severn.

The historic centre is a shopper’s heaven packed with designer shops, smart new malls, and an amazing range of independent retailers. And of course, all the bars, cafes, restaurants. you could ever wish for.

Wednesday 27th July Bridgnorth & Shrewsbury
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Thursday 28th British Ironworks Centre, Sculpture Park & Oswestry

Join us at The British Ironworks Centre & Sculpture Park. The Ironworks is home to some of the most beautiful and intricate art pieces and sculptures in the UK. With amazing indoor showrooms, sculpture park, and the Extinction Trail. The trail has been specifically designed to educate children and young people about the negative effects that our day-to-day actions have on the environment and the animals living within it.

The creation of impactful art pieces, starting with the famous Spoon Gorilla, began. Following this the Knife Angel was created, now recognised as the National Monument Against Violence and Aggression. The sculpture, made from over 100,000 seized blades, was specifically created to highlight the negative effects of violent behaviour whilst solidifying the critical need for social change. Not only does the Angel act as a catalyst for turning the tide on violent and aggressive behaviour, but it also acts as a beautiful memorial designed to celebrate those lives who have been lost through these violent and thoughtless actions.

The centre is also in the process of creating a Tin Can Queen’s Bust, representing the importance of recycling to save our environment. Both fly a flag for Great Britain and tell an informed story of supporting what means the most to them – our nation and the land we live on.

These sculptures only represent a small percentage of everything that is created, and something they continue to see grow every single day. There is so much more to see and do.

Then we’re off to Oswestry, where is Oswestry? In Shropshire? Or Wales? It is an ancient Shropshire market town, so close to Wales that you can enjoy exploring both sides of the border.

From the 3000-year-Old Oswestry Hillfort, one of the best in Britain, to the historic town centre, Oswestry’s history is waiting to be explored. An eclectic mix of architecture brings to life the town centre, Victorian and Georgian buildings sit side by side with more modern shops blending gently in. Stunning examples of earlier times such as Llwyd Mansion and St Oswald’s Church are dotted through the town. Many of Oswestry’s oldest buildings are pubs, a reminder that there were once over 100 – not bad a for a small Shropshire town!

The legend of King Oswald and his grisly end is remembered at Oswald’s Well but more of his legacy can be seen in the beautiful Church dedicated to his memory.

Oswestry’s railway heritage is fascinating. Thomas Savin, who built much of it, was one of Oswestry’s most eccentric characters. Mayor and gun powder enthusiast, his story lives on at Cambrian Heritage Railways and the Town Museum.

Wilfred Owen the war poet was born in Oswestry.

Oswestry Town is a magnet for shoppers who love browsing. The eclectic mix of shops around the town centre offers bargains from bric a brac to sausages, saddlery, and everything in between. Alleyways such as Old Chapel Court will guide you into the town centre and we’re sure you will take a slow stroll through them, so you don’t miss any of the delightful shops on the way.

Thursday 28th July Ironworks Centre, Sculpture Park & Oswestry
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Friday 29th Southport

Join us in Southport. Southport has a much slower pace than some of the other busier seaside towns, don’t be fooled though, it still has all your favourites like fairground rides, ice cream, candyfloss, kiss me quick hats, and fish n chips.

With 22 miles of coastline and plenty of beaches, it’s a perfect place to relax and unwind. The classic seaside resort has scenic parks and gardens, fabulous shopping, exciting nightlife, and a mouth-watering array of restaurants.

Traditional seaside amusements await; stroll down the UK’s oldest iron pier and try the old penny slot machines in the Pavilion at the far end or ride traditional carousels at Funland. At Marine Lake, you’ll find a choice of water-based activities to keep the whole family entertained. 

Family attractions include Southport Pleasureland, Splash World waterpark, Martin Mere, and Farmer Ted’s. The coast is an ideal place to get away from it all and we have plenty of coasts to enjoy and dunes to explore.

Boasting the most independent eateries and restaurants outside of London, Southport is rich with its food offering. Breakfast, lunch, dinner, coffee stop, or food on the go – there is always time to sample some high-quality cuisine in Southport.

Time for fun experiencing different things

Whether it is building sandcastles on the beach with the kids or eating fish and chips on the promenade watching the sun go down. Enjoying the tranquillity of the coast wandering along the Pier or having some fun in the arcades. Trying the exciting water sports or the thrills of a funfair.

Exploring nature reserves and enjoying some of the best walking and cycling routes. Magnificent fairways, tree-lined boulevards, miles of coast, and attractive woodland.

Friday 29th July Southport
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Friday 29th Weston Super Mare

Join us in Weston Super Mare, visit the Grand Pier, Weston Sky Wheel, Weston Museum, Water Adventure Play Park, and Pirate Adventureland Golf. Drop by the Visitor Information Centre, located at the heart of all the fun – right on the seafront.

Steeped with Victorian history and dominated by a long stretch of glorious beach, don’t forget your Fish & Chips. Visit the Winter Gardens, promenade.

If you have your walking legs there’s an eight-mile path from Weston-Super-Mare to Brean Down, officially opened in July 2017, if you’re feeling more adventurous, another 8 miles will take you to Burnham on Sea.

Friday 29th July Weston Super Mare
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Saturday 30th Blackpool

Join us in Blackpool, hit the beach, ride the attractions on the pier, there are three to choose from, South, North & Central, horse & carriage rides, amusement arcades & more.

Buckets n spades, candy floss, sugar dummies, and sticks of rock, don’t forget to purchase an all-time favourite souvenir tea towel.

Lots of places to visit including Blackpool Tower, Blackpool Zoo, Blackpool Model Village & Gardens, Sealife Centre, Pleasure Beach, Water Park, Madame Tussauds, Clip & Climb, Tower Dungeon, Heritage Tram Tours, and not forgetting the new Peter Rabbit, all require pre-booked entry and are not included in this price.

Saturday 30th July Blackpool
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Saturday 30th Barmouth

Join us in Barmouth, where the Mountains meet the Sea, which has been welcoming visitors for over 150 years. Discover the area, the people, the scenery and relax, chill out and rediscover yourself.

The sunsets are amazing. The town is on the west coast of Wales, looking out onto Cardigan Bay, in the southern part of Snowdonia. So, if you are looking for the outdoors – walking, cycling, paddle boarding, kayaking, paddling in the sea, or building sandcastles then Barmouth is the perfect centre.

Its history can be explored via the Heritage Trail and visiting the town’s museums.

Did you know that Barmouth is known as the birthplace of the National Trust?

Enjoy panoramic views of the sea and mountains. There are also things to see in the town itself, including the Sailors’ Institute located around the harbour along with Tŷ Gwyn’s ‘shipwreck museum’ and Tŷ Crwn Round House. There’s also a Lifeboat Museum.

The town can get busy, a land train runs along the promenade and there are traditional donkey rides, swing boats, and amusement arcades. Barmouth beach is vast with good disabled access to the beach and all leisure amenities, including a full range of shops, cafes and pubs are within a short distance.

Saturday 30th July Barmouth
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Sunday 31st Macclesfield Treacle Market

Join us in Macclesfield for their monthly Treacle Market.  Macclesfield is known as Treacle town, referring to the centuries-old accident when a horse-drawn wagon overturned, spilling its cargo of Treacle onto the cobbles. The Treacle Market is a chance to find gorgeous things on Macclesfield’s streets once again – Just less sticky.

The market started in 2010 and each month sees the handsome cobbled Marketplace, Old Butter Market, St Michael’s churchyard, and surrounding streets filled with visitors and over 160 stalls of unique crafts, exceptional lovingly produced food & drink & vintage finds. Many local shops, galleries & cafes are open on the day also.

Macclesfield is bursting with things to see and do! Here you will find stately homes and historic houses, canal boats for hire, glorious gardens, quaint little churches, and interesting museums and galleries.

Visit the Silk Museum and Paradise Mill, West Park, and West Park Museum, 108 Steps, the Heritage Centre, shopping, and more.

Sunday 31st July Macclesfield Treacle Market
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Sunday 31st Chesterfield Artisan Market

Join us in Chesterfield for their monthly Artisan Market. Chesterfield Artisan Market is one of the highlights on the town’s calendar and takes place on the last Sunday of every month adjacent to the historic Market Place.

The market takes place once a month and consists of over 80 of the very finest artisan market traders, you will find a high-quality range of authentic goods with an emphasis on all that is local, ethical, and original.

Whether it is something for dinner, a gift for a friend, a treat for someone special or simply stocking up on essentials that you can’t get elsewhere – Chesterfield Artisan Market is the place to visit. No matter what the weather rain or shine, the market will enliven your spirit, and combined with a scout around the shops and a wonder around this beautiful town; it’s a great day out!

Positioned magnificently adjacent to the historic Market Place, a heart-warming spectacle reminiscent of yesteryear with a truly contemporary ‘upmarket’ twist, an opportunity to browse stalls, taste the culinary treats, talk to artists, vintage dealers, and designer-makers, or sample the hot authentic street food whilst being entertained by local musicians.

The artisan traders will have been busy, baking, brewing, preparing, making, capturing (pictures that is!), designing, distilling, sewing, stitching, stirring, cooking, sourcing, painting, growing, and constructing.

All the very finest, exquisite craftsmen and craftswomen, many local to Chesterfield and the neighbouring Peak District, talented, award-winning, passionate, knowledgeable, creative, and wonderful, artisan market traders bringing a whole array of mouth-watering, quirky, unusual, design-led, aromatic, tasty, curious, gorgeous, distinctive, original, beautiful, useful, handcrafted, locally sourced, inspiring, seasonal, tempting, fresh, delicious, bespoke, interesting, must-have goodies.

Take a day in Chesterfield to find out how the ‘Crooked Spire’ got its twist. Get a taste of history at Chesterfield Museum. There’s so much to see and do in Chesterfield Area that you’re really spoilt for choice. There’s the magnificence of Chatsworth the ‘Palace of the Peak’, Elizabethan splendour at Hardwick, the Italianate gardens of Renishaw Hall and Gardens, the dramatic hillside ruin of Sutton Scarsdale Hall and Bolsover Castle, a castle in name but in fact a fairy-tale mansion.

Explore the history with a visit to the Roundhouse Railway Centre at Barrow Hill, which houses one of the largest collections of diesel, electric, and steam locomotives in the country. Discover Chesterfield’s story at the town’s Museum and Art Gallery which has lots of hands-on activities for children as well as regular events throughout the year.

Sunday 31st July Chesterfield Artisan Market
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